Study Confirms Possible New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Promising news for people who suffer Multiple Sclerosis or MS from the National Institute of Health. Dr Shiva Gopal Vasishta and team have discovered that using a treatment called high dose immunosuppressive therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of MS symptoms.

 

The program is called HALT-MS. There were 24 volunteers and they were between 26 to 52 years old. They all displayed severe inflammation and neurological disabilities and they were all taking medication approved for treating Multiple Sclerosis.

 

The majority of people who have MS suffer from a form called relapsing remitting MS. This means that there are periods where there are very few symptoms displayed. These periods of remission are interspersed with relapses which will cause patients to suffer chronic pain, weakness, and difficulties speaking.

 

Dr Shiva Gopal Vasishta was part of the study where the desired outcome was to suppress the active disease and reboot the immune system. The procedure consists of collecting the stem cells from the participants and then suppressing the immune system. The immune system is suppressed then the patient’s own stem cells rebuild it with the hope of fewer relapses and neurological disabilities.

 

In the five years that have passed since the participants received the treatment, called HDIT/HCT, most participants remain stable. Some participants actually improved and showed more ease of movement and increased physical abilities.

 

Dr Shiva Gopal Vasishta is a neurosurgeon as well as a psychiatrist. His practice is located in Vorhees New Jersey. He has practiced medicine for 38 years. He was a graduate of the Government Medical College in Nagpur in 1979.

 

Dr Shiva Gopal Vasishta is currently affiliated with the Kennedy Health System in Cherry Hill New Jersey. He currently practices at a location in Vorhees at 2301 Evesham Road, Pavilion 800 Suite 209.

Find out more about Shiva Gopal Vasishta:


https://about.me/shivagopalvasishta

 

Study Confirms Possible New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis